Richard M. Stallman: Tactless and Tasteless in the Wake of the Peru Quake

In a move seemingly designed to compete with Bob Murray's recent insensitivity, Richard M. Stallman, a founding figure of the free software movement, decided to end a short article about the recent earthquake in Peru with a bizarre nonsequitur paragraph attacking religious belief. With no warning whatsoever, he launches into the following:

I read that a church collapsed on worshipers during mass; later I heard that the priest had been rescued. Believers surely attributed the rescue to the good will of a benevolent deity. They probably did not attribute the collapse to the ill will of an evil deity, but it would be equally logical. In the 18th century, an earthquake destroyed a cathedral in Lisbon, killing thousands of believers. Many in Europe began to doubt religion as a result.

What the duce? How does that fit into an article to tell everyone that he survived the quake without injury? More importantly, how on earth does he think it proper decorum to launch into an anti-faith attack on the dead that haven't even been buried? It's almost like he's channeling Fred Phelps except in the opposite extreme.

Mr. Stallman, you owe those families an apology for being an insensitive jerk. Maybe in the future you can stick to talking about free software instead of going off the reservation. 

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2 Responses to Richard M. Stallman: Tactless and Tasteless in the Wake of the Peru Quake

  1. Sherpa says:

    That paragraph makes absolutely no sense. wth? It reads almost like those paragraphs from spam e-mail that I just shake my head at.

  2. Sherpa says:

    Besides, that title of the article is misleading. He was in Lima, not Ica or that close to the epicenter. He felt the quake, but he was in an area that got minimal damage compared to the towns further south.

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